Category Archives: Progressive Enterprise Architecture Map (PEAM)

Crossing the Chasm: Progressive​ Enterprise Architecture Model (PEAM)

[Updated October 5, 2016]

Inspired by Gerben Wierda’s thoughtful discussion about how the full framework is depicted in the new ArchiMate* 3.0 specification (An AchiMate 3 Map (Layers? What Layers! — 1)), I’m going to suggest there’s another level of improvement that can be made to the specification’s “peanut butter and jelly sandwich” diagram. [Please excuse the visual metaphor but that’s what it looks like – with PB&J leaking out on all sides.]

image004

Figure 1. ArchiMate 3 Layers and Aspects

In his posting, Gerben suggests a succession of improvements (depicted below).

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Figure 2. Gerben Wierda’s Suggested Improvements

But they still left my question unanswered: Why were Strategy, Motivation, Implementation & Migration left as disconnected layers on opposite sides of the enterprise architecture map? [I don’t accept Motivation being classed as an Aspect but that’s a topic for another article.]

What happened to the architectural principles of simplicity and elegance?

Aren’t the following series of enterprise architecture maps more informative and more understandable?  …more pragmatically useful?  I refer to the version below as the Progressive Enterprise Architecture Map.

Progressive EA Model 1-0-2-Base-Slide

Progressive EA Model 1-0-2-Layers-Slide

Progressive EA Model 1-0-2-Aspects-Slide

Progressive EA Model 1-0-2-Both-Slide

Figure 3. Progressive Enterprise Architecture Model: Progressive Enterprise Architecture Map

Check them out for yourself and please add your feedback in the Comments section below. Click on any diagram to see a larger version.

Best regards,
Michael Herman (Toronto)

p.s. If the arrows make the enterprise architecture map too prescriptive from a pure ArchiMate specification perspective, what do you think of this version?

Progressive EA Model 1-0-3-NoArrows-Slide

p.p.s. In October 2016, in the article Crossing the Enterprise Architecture Chasm, I extended PEAMs to include:

  • Continuous Transformations
  • Strategy Chasm
  • Enterprise Architecture Chasm

Here’s an example (click to enlarge):

progressive-ea-model-1-0-6-peam3-chasms

*ArchiMate is a registered trademark of The Open Group.

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Filed under ArchiMate, Architecture Reference Models, Automated Application Architecture Analysis, Crossing the EA Charm, Enterprise Architecture, Progressive Enterprise Architecture Map (PEAM), The Open Group

What’s the difference between improving the design and operation of an aircraft engine vs. an enterprise?

Answer: Nothing

Continuous Transformation 2

Continuous Transformation 1.png

Continuous Transformation is a key principle of the Progressive Enterprise Architecture Model (PEAM); part of the practice of Total Enterprise Architecture Management (TEAM).

Best regards,
Michael Herman (Toronto)
Parallelspace Corporation

mwherman@parallelspace.net

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Filed under Architecture Reference Models, Business Value, Crossing the EA Charm, Enterprise Architecture, Enterprise Architecture Chasm, Progressive Enterprise Architecture Map (PEAM), The Open Group

How We Think About How We Work

How do we think about how we work? We rely on a few simple processes. Here is a list:

  • Progressive Improvement & Learning Process (PILP)
  • Continuous Transformation Process (CTP)
  • Deliverable Review: Initiate, Create, Review, Validate & Approve Process (ICRVA Process – “I crave a” Process)
  • Purpose: Awareness, Knowledge, Understanding, and Wisdom

Many thanks go to Alison Williams for helping me to clarify the Continuous Transformation Process (CTP).

Michael Herman (Toronto)

Progressive Improvement through Continuous Transformation

Progressive Improvement thru Continuous Transformation 1-0-1

Progressive Improvement & Learning Process (PILP)

Progressive Improvement A 1-0-1

Progressive Improvement B 1-0-1

Continuous Transformation Process (CTP)

Parallelspace Continuous Transformation 2-0-1

Deliverable Review

Initiate, Create, Review, Validate & Approve (ICRVA) Process (“I crave a” Process)

Parallelspace ICRVA v12-0-2

Parallelspace ICRVA v12-0-2 Complete

The roles in the ICRVA process are based on the RACI matrix of responsibilities.

Purpose (When Writing or Creating a Presentation)

  1. Awareness (An Overview of what is being described (Information))
  2. Knowledge (The “What” of what is being described)
  3. Understanding (The “How” of what is being described)
  4. Wisdom (Deep Knowledge and Understanding acquired through Experience)

Intended Audience Statement (Example)

The intended audience for this tutorial about Structured Credentials is a broad range of professionals interested in furthering the application of Verifiable Credentials technology for use in software apps, agents, and services. The primary audience includes software architects, application developers, and user experience (UX) specialists; as well as people involved in a broad range of standards efforts related to decentralized identity, verifiable credentials, and secure storage.

Michael Herman’s Hierarchies

  • Awareness – Knowledge – Understanding – Wisdom
  • Dream – Desire – Want – Need
  • Sensing – Learning – Training – Experiencing
  • Keywords – (Controlled) Vocabulary – Glossary – Dictionary – Taxonomy – Ontology

Michaels Hierarchies

Product Management: 3 Prioritization Levels

  1. Need to have
  2. Nice to have
  3. *Neat* to have

Scalability Levels

hyper-scalability-1-0-1

Best regards,
Michael Herman (Toronto)
Parallelspace Corporation
mwherman@parallelspace.net

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Filed under Architecture Reference Models, continuous transformation, Crossing the EA Charm, Definitions, How do we think, Parallelspace TDM, Process, Progressive Enterprise Architecture Map (PEAM)

External IoT vs. Internal IoT: Beware of the Hype Cycle

Subtitle: Fusing Enterprise IoT and Traditional Enterprise Architecture

Context

External IoT – External world of devices, events, connections, storage, and analysis; the “traditional” Internet of Things; the world of devices outside the enterprise.

Internal IoT – Internal world within the enterprise consisting of business processes, business objects, actors and roles; application components, application services, application functionality, and data objects; and lastly, infrastructure consisting of servers, networks, data stores, foundation services, and foundational functionality. The “hum” within an Enterprise.

Enterprise IoT – The confluence or integration of External IoT and Internal IoT landscapes centered around a particular enterprise organization. Often represented and accessed as an enterprise graph.

Ecosystem IoT – The confluence or integration of 2 or more separate Enterprise IoT landscapes (complete or partial) centered around a specific ecosystem or community. Supporting Federated Enterprise Architecture.

Discussion

Do some of these latter terms sound familiar?  If so, you likely have some exposure, background, and experience with the practice of Enterprise Architecture Management (EAM).  Having lived on both sides of the IoT divide for more than a decade, it’s interesting to watch how the current rage around IoT is almost exclusively focused on External IoT and it’s coupling to Business Intelligence and Analysis.

What about what’s happening inside the business, information, application and infrastructure architecture of our own enterprises? …regardless of whether the “things” are internal to your organization, external to your organization, or, possibly, part of someone else’s organization (e.g. owned by a client, customer, partner, …), it’s all part of the Enterprise IoT landscape.

A good name for the combination of External IoT and Internal IoT is the “Enterprise of Things” …but another organization is already using this term.

Ultimately, this is all about the Internet of Things merged and being combined with Enterprise Architecture Management: Enterprise IoT.

“More news at 11…”

Michael Herman (Toronto)

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Filed under Crossing the EA Charm, Definitions, Enterprise Architecture, Graphitization, IoT, Progressive Enterprise Architecture Map (PEAM)