“Truly Collaborative Business Solutions” for Groove Workspace from Parallelspace Corporation

(1/5) @Ray Ozzie on the importance of understanding one’s self… This, to me personally, is the most impactful of all of Ray’s #CHMFellows #vignettes. https://instagram.com/p/CMf8X_SJdFw/

(2/5) Took me a long time to figure out who I am …in fact, it took until just recently. I’m a #FirstPrinciples Thinker: https://hyperonomy.com/2021/03/10/first-principles-thinking/
…which can be a huge frustration to me and those around me when you aren’t cognizant of who you are. Thank you @Ray Ozzie #CHMFellows

(3/5) For example, remember the Groove Tool development environment Parallelspace Corporation created using an the C Preprocessor and the (depreciated) Microsoft Visual Interdev web development platform (a precursor to Visual Studio)? #FirstPrinciples Thinking. #CHMFellows

(4/5) Groove Tools like Parallelspace eMail …the fully functional version of Microsoft Outlook that ran transparently inside a Groove workspace. #FirstPrinciples Thinking. #CHMFellows

(5/5) And many, many other custom Groove tools based on #FirstPrinciples Thinking. Thank you @Ray Ozzie
https://hyperonomy.com/2021/03/17/truly-collaborative-business-solutions-for-groove-workspace-from-parallelspace-corporation/

(6/5) …all accomplished with my trusted colleague Sanjay Malhotra. Great times. 🙂

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TDW Glossary Relationship Compass

The TDW Glossary Relationship Compass was inspired by:

  1. ANSI/NISO Z39.19-2005: Guidelines for the Construction, Format, and Management of Monolingual Controlled Vocabularies
  2. Synaptica KMS – Enterprise Taxonomy Management
  3. TDW Glossary Management and Collaboration Platform (TDW-GMCP): Initial Results

Click each figure to enlarge it.

The points of the TDW Glossary Relationship Compass are based on the relationship types defined in ANSI/NISO Z39.19-2005.

Figure 1. TDW Glossary Relationship Compass
Figure 2. Neighborhood example from the TDW Glossary: MT: Digital Identity
Figure 3. TDW Glossary Relationship Compass for an example: MT: Decentralized Identity
Figure 4. Neighborhood example annotated using the TDW Glossary Relationship Compass: MT: Decentralized Identity
Figure 5. Neighborhood example annotated with Related Terms (RT): MT: Decentralized Identity

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TDW Decentralized Glossary Management and Collaboration Platform (TDW Glossary): Digital Identity Neighborhood

Figure 1. Digital Identity Neighborhood

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Technical White Paper (TWP) Development Plan and Schedule – Microsoft Corporation

Click here to download the Technical White Paper (TWP) Document Development Plan and Schedule (PDF).

Acknowledgements

  • Microsoft Corporation

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TDW Hub Architecture Reference Model (HUB-ARM) – Version 0.104

Click the HUB-ARM to enlarge it. It will open in a new tab. Read the narration provided below the HUB-ARM.

Figure 1. TDW Hub Architecture Reference Model (HUB-ARM)

Narration

Each bullet in the list below describes a numbered bubble in the diagram above.

  1. Alice’s App (1) has secure access to Alice’s Public Data (5), Alice’s Private Data (8), and Alice’s Secret Data (11).
  2. Alice’s App (1)’s secure access is realized by the Layer D Hub Service Endpoints (2). The Layer D Hub Service Endpoints (2) support intelligent, semantics-based, query-by-schema access via a pubic interface exposed by a collection of Hub Protocol Handlers (3).
  3. Layer D Hub Service Endpoints (2)’s collection of supported Hub Protocol Handlers (3) might include: Bluetooth, HTTP REST, gRPC, Web Sockets, etc.
  4. Layer D Hub Service Endpoints (2) primarily provide access to the functionality supported by the Layer D Federated Query and Retrieval Service (4). The functionality supported by the Layer D Federated Query and Retrieval Service includes intelligent federated routing of semantics and schema-based queries plus aggregated retrieval of matching resources from Alice’s Public Data (5), Alice’s Private Data (8), and/or Alice’s Secret Data (11).
  5. Alice’s Public Data (5) is managed by the Hub Microkernel (6) which supports UJWT Data Vaults (7) containing collections of unsigned JWT resources.
  6. The Hub Microkernel (6) provides CRUD access to the collections of unsigned JWT resources in one or more UJWT Data Vaults (7) attached to the Hub Microkernel (6).
  7. One or more UJWT Data Vaults (7) can be attached to a Hub Microkernel (6) and are used to store collections of unsigned JWT resources.
  8. Alice’s Private Data (8) is managed by the Hub Microkernel (9) which supports JWS Data Vaults (10) containing collections of JWS (signed JWT) resources.
  9. The Hub Microkernel (9) provides CRUD access to the collections of JWS (signed JWT) resources in one or more JWS Data Vaults (10) attached to the Hub Microkernel (9).
  10. One or more JWS Data Vaults (10) can be attached to a Hub Microkernel (9) and are used to store collections of JWS (signed JWT) resources.
  11. Alice’s Secret Data (11) is managed by the EDV Microkernel (12) which supports JWE Data Vaults (13) containing collections of JWE (encrypted JWT) resources.
  12. The EDV Microkernel (12) provides CRUD access to the collections of JWE (encrypted JWT) resources in one or more JWE Data Vaults (13) attached to the EDV Microkernel (12).
  13. One or more JWE Data Vaults (13) can be attached to an EDV Microkernel (12) and are used to store collections of JWE (encrypted JWT) resources.
  14. An Indexing Crawler Service (14) might enable the indexing of publicly available content in Alice’s Data Vaults (7, 10, 13). Private and Secret Data Vaults will most likely not expose any indexable data vault-level or resource-level data.
  15. A Data Vault Directory Service (DVDS) (15) might exist to enable the lookup and resolution of Alice’s Data Vaults (7,10, 13) by various public data vault properties. Private and Secret Data Vaults will most likely not expose any public data vault properties and would not be locatable using the DVDS (15).

Acknowledgements

The above proposal for describing a Hub using the TDW Hub Architecture Reference Model (HUB-ARM) was inspired by Daniel Buchner’s verbal description of a Hub during the DIF SDS/CS call on Thursday, March 11, 2021 plus subsequent conversations on the DIF SDS/CS mailing list (Adrian Gropper).

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Trusted Content Storage (TCS Stack): Decentralized Twitter (Dewitter) Platform Requirements List – Version 0.37 March 18, 2021

To download a copy of the Dewitter Platform Requirements List, click here:

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SDS/CS Workflow – Iteration 2

Click to the figure to enlarge it.

Figure 1. SDS/CS Workflow – Iteration 2

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March 11, 2021 · 11:49 am

First Principles Thinking

“Sometimes called “reasoning from first principles,” the idea is to break down complicated problems into basic elements and then reassemble them from the ground up. It’s one of the best ways to learn to think for yourself, unlock your creative potential, and move from linear to non-linear results.”

First Principles: The Building Blocks of True Knowledge (https://fs.blog/2018/04/first-principles/)

“I think it is most important to reason from first principles rather than by analogy. One of the ways we conduct our lives is we reason by analogy. We do this because something was like something else that was done or it was like what other people were doing. It’s mentally easier to reason by analogy rather than from first principles.”

First Principles Method Explained by Elon Musk (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NV3sBlRgzTI)
Video 1. First Principles Method Explained by Elon Musk (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NV3sBlRgzTI)

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The Rise and Fall of a Brand: Michael Eisner

Download this presentation from here: The Rise and Fall of a Brand: Michael Eisner.

If you don’t have time, the following is the key slide.

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TDW Decentralized Glossary Management and Collaboration Platform (TDW Glossary): Initial Results

And voila, it worked first crack.  Here are links to a couple of sample definitions:

Yesterday afternoon, I downloaded and imported the entire Sovrin Glossary V3 into Archi and the https://github.com/mwherman2000/tdw-glossary-1 repository. It contains all 249 SF Glossary terms and definitions plus a couple dozen of my own definitions (yes, the TDW Glossary supports ingesting multiple upstream glossaries and can create/refresh multiple downstream glossaries.)

Here are some screenshots:

Figure 1. Layered visualization using the TDW Glossary 6-Layer Domain (and Relationship) Model
Figure 2: Digital Identity Neighborhood Example
Figure 3. Archi free, open-source, GUI tool doing a check-in of the term “Digital Identity” and its definition into the https://github.com/mwherman2000/tdw-glossary-1 repository
Figure 4. Open Group ArchiMate 3.0 Architecture Modeling Platform support in Archi 4.8.1

Archi Open Source Modeler for Architecture Modeling

The Archi® modeling toolkit is targeted toward all levels of Enterprise Architects and Modelers. It provides a low cost to entry solution to users who may be making their first steps in the ArchiMate modeling language, or who are looking for an open-source, cross-platform ArchiMate modeling tool for their company or institution and wish to engage with the language within a TOGAF® or other Enterprise Architecture framework.

Archi open source modeler website (https://www.archimatetool.com/)

You can download and support the latest version of Archi from here: https://www.archimatetool.com/ .

You can download the latest version of the coArchi, Model Collaboration Plugin for Archi from here: https://www.archimatetool.com/plugins/#coArchi

Best regards,
Michael Herman
Sovrin Foundation Self-Sovereignist

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